Clojure Support on Heroku

Heroku is known for its [Ruby](http://ruby-lang.org) hosting and later added [node.js support](http://blog.heroku.com/archives/2010/4/28/node_js_support_experimental/) as well. Now, [Heroku also supports Clojure](http://blog.heroku.com/archives/2011/7/5/clojure_on_heroku/): > We’re very excited to announce official support for [Clojure](http://clojure.org), going into public beta as of today. Clojure is the third official language supported by Heroku, and is available on the [Cedar stack](http://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/cedar). [Clojure](http://clojure.org) is aContinue reading “Clojure Support on Heroku”

On Language Design: Magic Variables in Compojure

The Perl language is riddled with special variables. Consider the following example: open(FILE, “bla.txt”); while(<FILE>) { print; } In case you don’t speak Perl, this is equivalent to: open(FILE, “bla.txt”); while(<FILE>) { print $_; } Still unclear? Alright, once more: open(FILE, “bla.txt”); while($line = <FILE>) { print $line; } Perl is developed by linguist LarryContinue reading “On Language Design: Magic Variables in Compojure”

On Language Design: My Problem With ClojureQL

Update: Since this post, ClojureQL has been completely redesigned, my criticism in this post no longer applies. You can find more information about the new ClojureQL on its new website. Every programming language comes with a certain syntax, a certain feel for what feels like native use of that syntax, and the semantics of theContinue reading “On Language Design: My Problem With ClojureQL”

Interesting Clojure Projects

Some pointers for new explorers of Clojure. IDE-related: VimClojure SLIME for Clojure on Emacs Enclojure, a NetBeans plugin DSLs/libraries built for Clojure: ClojureQL (Clojure Query Language) Compojure, a Clojure web framework CongoMongo, a MongoDB library Cow-blog, simple blogging software written using Compojure Other: Clojure reddit

Brief Introduction to Clojure

Clojure (pronounced “Closure”) is a relatively new programming language which runs on the Java Virtual Machine. This is roughly what it looks like: defn say-hello-to [name]  println “Hello,” name Neat, huh? Well, ok, I was lying a little bit in order not to scare you, because… pss, Clojure is a Lisp! You’re still here? Alright.Continue reading “Brief Introduction to Clojure”