The Graham Digest

I got my computer-law test today, so once again I don’t have too much time for an extensive post. Multiple people have been sending me suggestions on what to write about throughout the past few weeks, I want to thank them a lot for that, I really appreciate it. Trouble with those suggestions is that they need more than a couple of minutes of research, so I’ll postpone them until I have a little more time. Just be patient, I didn’t forget about them, so keep sending me those suggestions!

For today I’d like to point you to Paul Graham’s latest four stories; none of which I’ve had time to read yet, but that shouldn’t stop you, you may have a little more time on your hands.

“A Unified Theory of VC Suckage”:http://www.paulgraham.com/venturecapital.html:

A couple months ago I got an email from a recruiter asking if I was interested in being a “technologist in residence” at a new venture capital fund. I think the idea was to play Karl Rove to the VCs’ George Bush.

I considered it for about four seconds. Work for a VC fund?
Ick.

“More Advice for Undergrads”:http://www.paulgraham.com/undergrad2.html:

I asked several friends who were professors and/or eminent hackers what they thought of “Undergraduation”:http://www.paulgraham.com/college.html. Their comments were so good that I thought I’d just give them directly to you.

“Wrting, Briefly”:http://www.paulgraham.com/writing44.html:

A lot of people ask for advice about writing. How important is it to write well, and how can one write better? In the process of answering one, I accidentally wrote a tiny essay on the subject.

I usually spend weeks on an essay. This one took 67 minutes — 23 of writing, and 44 of rewriting. But as an experiment I’ll put it online. It is at least extremely dense.

“Return of the Mac”:http://www.paulgraham.com/mac.html:

All the best hackers I know are gradually switching to Macs. My friend Robert said his whole research group at MIT recently bought themselves Powerbooks. These guys are not the graphic designers and grandmas who were buying Macs at Apple’s low point in the mid 1990s. They’re about as hardcore OS hackers as you can get.

The reason, of course, is OS X. Powerbooks are beautifully designed and run FreeBSD. What more do you need to know?